COLLECTIONS: ART POTTERY

imagePhoto was taken from the Pottery Boys website.

I have been posting about the Pottery Boys  www.potteryboys.com this week and their open house this Saturday, August 19th.   The piece above is from their vast collection, each piece I feel is extraordinary.  I wanted to share a few more of their pieces, a glimpse into the creativity of David Erpenbach, another skilled artist, and delve into a collection at the Chicago History Museum www.chicagohistory.org

imageOne of the Pottery Boys pieces and an up close photo of the special top. The details look like jewelry.  Both photos were taken by me in their Studio. image

imageAnother from their website.

imageAnother photo I took in the Studio.

imageFrom Tom Mantel and Tom Hawley’s Collection, I featured the grouping of three pieces in another post here is the very large piece close up and then the exquisite detail of the top of the sculpture and the intricate almost lace like work of the body of the piece.

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While I was preparing this post my thoughts wandered back in time to the apartment of a dear friend and colleague at Columbia College Chicago, Dianne Erpenbach and her husband, Jon, and their collection of their son, David’s unique, and wonderful art pottery.  Why don’t ask me, I haven’t thought about it in years.  I contacted Dianne who in turn let David know I was interested in seeing his current work.  I asked him to share his thoughts as well…you know I will do that!

Here are those thoughts and some of his special pieces:

“I use traditional wheel thrown and hand built techniques to begin all of my pieces. My vision is to take traditional pottery forms and make them more unique by cutting, altering and adding several thrown and hand built pieces to create one final form. Some of my pieces may use up to ten or more thrown or hand built pieces to create one piece. I do not use molds so all of my pieces are original and one of a kind. My experience with firing includes High Fire reduction, High and Low Fire oxidation, Soda Fire, Salt Fire, Pit Fire and Raku. I have five years of learning and experimentation during my undergraduate study at Northern Michigan University where I completed my Bachelor of Fine Arts with a studio concentration in ceramics.”

imageDavid Erpenbach at his wheel.

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imageMy favorites of David’s work…as you know I am a green girl, but these really drew me into them.  All above photos courtesy of David Erpenbach.

The Midwest is known for its pottery, think Ohio for an example, McCoy, Hall, Shawnee, USA, actually a mark not a brand, (all of which I collect in white, you have seen some of that collection, and some green pieces).  Roseville, Rookwood, and Weller, of course, and all the Arts and Crafts designers and Mid-Century artists.  The subject is huge and I will probably do future posts on it but I wanted to do a short photo essay on Teco which was/is done locally.  “The American Terra Cotta Tile and Ceramic Company was founded in 1881 in Terra Cotta, Illinois between Crystal Lake and McHenry.  It became the first American manufacturer of architectural terra cotta (I did a post on terra cotta a few weeks ago in my Thursday Collections series). The founder William Day Gates began experimenting with clays and glazes for art pottery which introduced TECO Pottery (TErra COtta) in 1899.  It is known for it’s Teco Green glaze, a smooth, microcrystalline, matte.” (Source Wikipedia).  I like to credit as much as I can to local resources for nenasnotes and I found several pieces housed in our Chicago History Museum Collections www.chicagohistory.org all from around l905.

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imageThe three pieces above are in the Chicago History Museum Decorative Arts Collection.

imageThis piece found on Pinterest photo credit unknown.  I think it is stunning.

imageAn out of print book….if you are interested I would suggest an internet search.

Of course, you will find many, many art pottery pieces to add to or start your collection at the Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com Saturday and Sunday, August 26 and 27 from 10 to 5.

 

COLLECTIONS: FANS

imageToday’s post on fans was suggested by my BFF, Stephanie Lake, those of you who have followed nenasnotes from the beginning remember the week long postings I did on Stephanie and I call upon her when I am doing my Thursday Collection posts to see if she has anything to contribute, this time she turned the tables on me and got my juices flowing and my post on FANS was born.  In the photo above you see a portion of her collection.  Let’s look at a couple more from her collection with her words talking about fans…

“What else is at once as practical and as extravagant as a fan?    

I keep favorites on my vanity and I am never without one, nor is Odette, who has her own collection and is extremely proud that she can operate folded fan.”

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imageTwo from Stephanie Lake’s collection.

imageStephanie holding her patriotic fan….

“My interest in fans started with my graduate work; one of my first research papers was titled “Fashions In Flirtation: Fans in Eighteenth-Century Europe.”   In it, I examined fans as “the most mercurial of accessories,” reaching their provocative apogee as a paralanguage of gestures developed during that century.  Manuals for the meaning of each gesture were sold together with the most expensive fans.  Among my favorite quotes is from Art dans la parure et le vetement: “whatever the heat of the climate may be, the fan is above all things . . . a means or motive of gracious movements, under the pretext of agitating the air for the sake of coolness.” 

When curatorial work brought me to Tokyo and Kyoto I was gifted a number of fans of the type associated with Geisha fan dances, which I use the most frequently.   I also inherited a number from Bonnie Cashin, including one on which a beau wrote a love poem and drew a little portrait, including the lines: “Well her second name is Cashin / nd she really is a dashin’ / for her I have a passion / leading to mashin’ / but that is so old fashion.”  The Romance of the fan lives on!”

imageBonnie Cashin’s fan.

imageA bit of flirtation from Stephanie and her adorable daughter, Odette.  Love them!  Thanks so much Stephanie for sharing some of your collection for nenasnotes.  You can find Stephanie at https://www.stephanielakedesign.com/ and her magnificent monograph on Bonnie Cashin, Chic is Where You Find It here:           https://www.amazon.com/Bonnie-Cashin-Chic-Where-Find/dp/0847848051re

This post is going to be all over the place so please forgive me (but quite franking most of my posts do ramble don’t they!!!!!).  Fans have been a part of many cultures, the subject of Haute Couture collections, Japanese dance and art, Impressionists paintings and on and on….let’s look at some of my favorites with a couple from my tiny collection.  I collected fans as a child and they, along with other items were stolen from our Evanston home many, many years ago.  I’m sure they weren’t valuable to anyone but me but no matter, they are long gone.  The two below (I can’t find the fan that was on all the chairs at the 2006 Fall Christian Lacroix Haute Couture collection when the temperature in Paris was in the high 90’s for the two weeks I was there!)

imageThe lace trimmed one I got in New Orleans while attending a Costume Society of America Symposium several years ago, I fell in love with NOLA and treated myself to several souvenirs, I am especially fond of this one.  The black ostrich fan was a gift. Nena’s photo.

Speaking of ostrich feather fans, the first thing that should pop into our minds would be Sally Rand and her infamous fans and her dance at the Century of Progress Fair in Chicago, which, by the way, my parents worked.  Daddy did artwork for some of the Fair’s posters.  Sally’s dance was quite a scandal and the notorious fans are now housed at The Chicago History Museum www.chicagohistory.org and were featured in an exhibition several years ago entitled What George Wore and Sally Didn’t.

imageSally and her fans.

imageDita Von Teese with her exotic plumage.

imageThe cover of the exhibition catalog from The Met’s Dangerous Liaisons 2004 exhibition mounted in the Wrightsman Galleries of 18th-century furniture, it was an extraordinary exhibit, small but mighty in its drama.  As I recall it was the first of the costume exhibitions that have been mounted in spaces throughout the Museum, www.metmuseum.org brilliant as we now know!!!!

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imageA rather plain fan against an opulent gown.

imageA Japanese print. Check out similiar prints at The Art Institute of Chicago www.artic.edu

imageFan being used in Japanese theater.

A few of the many examples of painting of women with fans…I chose a few of my favorites.imageLa Japonaise by Claude Monet 1876,  Museum of Fine Arts Boston Collection.

imageGirl With Fan 1881 Pierre-Auguste Renoir,  Hermitage Museum.  I saw this when I was in St. Petersberg.  The Impressionists paintings had just started to be exhibited, after decades in storage, and the colors were extraordinary.

imageGustav Klimt Woman with a Fan 1917-1918

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Some of the fans I liked on Pinterest…photo credits unknown.

imageMy most favorite of all, isn’t it a stunner!

imageFrom Kevin Gorsch’s collection the fan was signed to him by Faye Dunaway when he styled her for an event in Chicago early 2000’s  You get a bonus with Kevin’s silhouette in the photo….you can visit Kevin (you can follow him on Instagram at redleopardcrocodilevintage) and his extraordinary handbag and accessories collection, The Red Leopard Crocodile, in the Ballroom at the monthly Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com

imageYou know it is superb if it is by Valerie Steele!  One to add to your “fashion” book collection!

imageA preview of Friday’s Fashon Flashback post….can you guess who I will be featuring?  I will also continue the fan theme a little bit, so much interesting material.

All photos, unless otherwise noted, are from Pinterest photo credits unknown.

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY MUSINGS: I’M IN LOVE!!

imageHow I envision myself back in the day……painting by Tamara De Lempicka, I have always loved her work.

Yes, it is true, I am in love and who would have thought it would be with a car!!!!  I don’t drive (actually, I know how to drive, just have chosen not to do so although it would be nice to be able to get myself around when I am visiting in Indiana and Michigan, oh well!!!) and have never owned a car (not even as a child, my Father preferred public transportation!), but I have fallen hard for a vintage car that my dear friend, Tom Mantel, owns for his new business Chicago Classic Limo www.ChicagoClassicLimo.com

I realized that I know more about cars than I thought I did but learned so much more from Tom on this fantastic 1940 Packard.

imageWhy don’t they make cars like this anymore!!!!  Such a pity! Photo courtesy of Tom Mantel.

Last weekend we took the car to the Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com and had a blast talking with all the people who stopped by to admire the car.

imageAt Randolph Street Market.  Photo courtesy of Tom Mantel.

What was, even more, fun was riding in it to and from RSM, people were literally hanging out their car windows with cell phones at the ready, smiling and giving us thumbs up…I must admit most of the admirers were men…come on ladies, it is a beauty!!!! Thankfully we made it both ways without incident and made a lot of peoples day!

imageimageThe front seat with its original mohair upholstery.  Nena’s photo.

imageThe original steering wheel and dashboard, of course, it has been updated for modern times and is air-conditioned.  Photo courtesy of Tom Mantel.

imageimageThe back seat with its jump seats, I loved jump seats when I was a little girl, I thought they were there just for me!  Also notice the shaped windows, all of which open.  Photos courtesy of Tom Mantel.

imageThe front grill.  Nena’s photo.imageThe luggage rack, it pulls down, at the back of the car. Nena’s photo.

imagePhoto courtesy of Tom Mantel.

imageI am particularly fond of this photo. I think it looks like a watercolor if I do say so myself.  Nena’s photo.

imageWhitewall tires….I love seeing Tom’s reflection, it looks like he is driving, doesn’t it!  Photo courtesy of Tom Mantel.

imageI am crazy for this hood ornament. why don’t we have them anymore, what happened to the glamour of cars…and I must admit that I am very happy with my photo of it!  Your thoughts!?  Nena’s photo.

imageHere is the sketch for the piece, I found it on Pinterest photo credit unknown. Needs more research on the artist. imageHere are some more hood ornaments including the 1940 Super 8 in the upper right-hand corner.  Pinterest photo credit unknown.

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COLLECTIONS: MINATURE SHOES

imageMy mini collection of miniature shoes.  They sit on my decoupaged chest that held my Father’s paints.  Interesting that the Elfinware shoes have forget me knots on them and are on a postcard of them, who knew!  Not the world’s best photo but a hard one to capture with my handy dandy iPhone 7!

My collection began many, many years ago with the wooden snuff box given to me by the amazingly talented Beth Levine when she visited Saks Fifth Avenue Chicago with her Beth’s Bootery Collection, which was exclusive to the Store.  You will read her story in tomorrow’s Fashion Flashback post.  She collected these extraordinary boxes and created a shoe, in brown leather with gold detail I adored them, (wish I had a picture to share with you) that I owned and gave to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Fashion Resource Center, an extraordinary Collection under the supervision of the brilliant Gillion Carrara www.saic.edu

imageA close up of my snuff box.  My photo.

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imageThe two photos found on Pinterest, credit unknown.  The shoe above is what the front of my actual Beth’s Bootery shoe looked like.  A good look at the slide that opens to reveal the container for your snuff.

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imageThe two images above are inlaid with mother of pearl.  Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageIsn’t this a beauty inlaid with silver and the compartment flips up to reveal your snuff!  Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageMy favorite of all the wooden shoe snuff boxes…isn’t is a wonder, so very tiny with all the intricate carving…I want it!  Pinterest photo credit unknown.

My Mother collected Elfinware and we found many, many pieces at various prices, some quite expensive and others unbelievably “cheap”, all special to Mom and to me, do we see a post in the future…probably!  Made between 1920-1940 in Germany to look like Dresden the items were quite inexpensive (much like Jadelite and Depression Glass when they were introduced) and have become collector’s items.  Be sure to check out the Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com this weekend, July 29 and 30 from 10 to 5, you might find a piece of Elfinware or a shoe collectible or whatever strikes your fancy!

imageI have, over the years, given away several of Mom’s pieces to friends who wanted a token from her collections. My photo.

imageOne of my favorites, a Limoges snuff box, again featuring forget me knots,  Interestingly I don’t have any “shoes” with lily of the valley…I’ll have to look for one!  My photo.

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I am partial to this piece, it is English porcelain and the largest of the collection.  It has the look of Imari, don’t you agree….a charming manipulation of clay to form the ruffle on what to me looks like a shoe bootie!  My photo.

imageA similar piece found on Pinterest with handpainted flowers.  Photo credit unknown.

imageAs is my custom, here is a book for you to expand your knowledge, if you are so inclined, of the wonderful collectible world of snuff boxes.  What you say, you don’t do snuff, well just think of them as beautiful objects that you can admire, perhaps put your aspirin in one or two of them!  Enjoy….

WEDNESDAY MUSINGS: FAVORITE PINS THIS WEEK: GREEN

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I became addicted to Pinterest this weekend and found all manner of wondrous images of my all time favorite color…..green!  So why not do a post on all things green. Few words just glorious images like the above collage I prepared for the blog! I will identify my own photos, some may be repeats (sorry!) but mostly they are pins I have saved and don’t have photo credits

imageI adore color samples, here one of Pantone’s green palettes, these are the greens that are the most attractive to me, however, I do love all greens!

The following quote is attributed to the book,  Green: The History of a Color by Michael Pastoureau published by Princeton University Press (one of his series of books on color, I ordered mine immediately from www.amazon.com!!!!) “The color green is fickle, mutable, variously the color of love, youth, irresponsibility, but also madness, debauchery, and the underworld”.  

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imageFrom Carolyne Roehm www.carolyneroehm.com using an Ikat textile for her table setting, her “eye” is brilliant in all things, whether flowers, gardens or interiors.

imageAnother tablescape from Carolyne Roehm

 

imageI not only love this photo but want everything in it!!!! It is so me!

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I could live in any of these rooms and take inspiration for not only the color and the weathered look of the rooms but all the details large and small.

imageBeautifully detailed tiles.

imageA magnificent garden path leading to a secluded nook.

imageThe entrance to Monet’s home in Giverny

imageA fantastically beautiful solarium….

imageIvy on a brick wall from a weekend in Harbor Country my photo

imageA wood in Indiana my photo

imageI am mad for this capture….an exquisite bird sitting on a fern frond

imageFerns in a Blue Island garden my photo

imageI know I have posted this but it is a beauty with the gold embellished embossed leather binding, you might find something similar at the Newberry Library www.newberry.org Book Sale this week, Thursday through Sunday, July 27 through 30  or at this weekend’s RandolphStreet Market  www.randolphstreetmarket.com Saturday and Sunday.

imageMy all time favorite tree, a weeping redbud in full leaf, also in a Blue Island garden my photo

imageCan you believe this is a cabbage!  It is amazing and HUGE, the shades of an almost metallic green are extraordinary, another shot from my Harbor Country weekend.

imageI know I did this in another post but had to feature it again, John Galliano for Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall 2006 (the Collection I was fortunate to witness!!!!) Vogue photograph

imageA truly spectacular conifer in Harbor Country, my photo.

 

www.randolphstreetmarket.com

www.newberry.org

 

 

 

COLLECTIONS: BROWN TRANSFERWARE

imageA collection of brown transferware.  Photo courtesy of Pinterest credit unknown.

I did a post several months ago on blue and white transferware and discussed my own collection of green transferware, now here we are with brown.  Actually. these are the three colors I am familiar with (the blue and white), collections in friends homes, (the green) which I collect, or (brown) assembled while assisting with decorating a country home many years ago.  So brown it is today.  All of the colors and there are many, including pink, purple, red, even yellow, you will find examples to add to your collection or start a new passion at the monthly Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com which will be July 29 and 30 from 10 to 5.

“Transferware is a style of ceramics including pottery, dinnerware, and other delicate items. It uses transfer printing, a decorative technique which was developed in England, in the mid-18th century, particularly around the Staffordshire region.

The process starts with an engraved copper plate similar to those used for making paper engravings. The plate is used to print the pattern on tissue paper, then the tissue paper transfers the wet ink to the ceramic surface. The ceramic is then fired in a low-temperature kiln to fix the pattern. This can be done over or under the glaze, but the underprinting method is more durable. The process produces fine lines similar to the engraved prints in old books. Before transfer printing ceramics were hand painted, a laborious and costly process.”  From Wikipedia (never know how much to believe from this site but this seems accurate).

imageHere is a small portion of the collection I amassed several years ago.  It is a complete supper set found in various antique markets both here and abroad.  I started this collection before RSM began but have found items to add to it recently at the Market. I didn’t want anything very flowery nor with people but rather English scenes and a flower or two.  I don’t remember where I first found what I wanted for this country house but it just grew from there.  I do remember I was doing a fashion show out of town and went antiquing at a local mall on our way back to Chicago and happened to glance down into a case and there was an entire set of the exact pattern I was collecting…if you are a collector, you can only imagine my excitement…had to run out to find a cash machine and hurry back to make my purchase.  I have, as mentioned, added to the collection over the years but the place settings are done.  I add a pitcher, a platter, a bowl, etc. when I see them.  I particularly like the salt and pepper shakers on the top shelf, they were in the antique mall collection.

imageThe platter at the top of the breakfront was found at an antique market in the English country side.  I carried it and several other pieces back with me on the plane home, I was, for some unknown reason, upgraded to first class on the flight and my treasures were stowed very carefully by the flight attendant, she must have been a collector as well!

imageMore of the collection displayed on a rough white plaster wall.  I think very country, don’t you agree!

imageA group of pitchers found at various times on various treasure hunts.

imageI would love to find a similar cheese dome, isn’t it smashing!  Love it!  Pinterest image credit unknown.

imageGreat collection of plates from Pinterest photo credit unknown.

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imageA couple of reference books found on www.amazon.com

 

Photos are all taken by Nena with an iPhone7 unless otherwise noted.

Some sites to investigate:

www.marthastewart.com  Transferware article….excellent information

www.marthastewart.com  video Transferware Questions

www.marthastewart.com  video How to Display a Collection in a Cabinet

www.transcollectorsclub.org

I thought since we are English today why not a typical English “pudding”….

ENGLISH SUMMER PUDDING

imageEnglish Summer Pudding Pinterest photo credit unknown.

2 tablespoon water

150g (5oz ) sugar

450g (1 lb) washed, mixed summer fruits, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and blueberries

100 to 150g (4 to 6oz) day old white bread, sliced and crusts removed, I use the divine Authentic French Brioche from either Mariano’s or Whole Food, I am totally addicted to it…or day or two old store bought pound cake, the technique and amount remain the same

Whipped cream, ice cream or your favorite home made custard

METHOD:

Stir the water and sugar together and bring to a gentle boil. Add all the berries and fruits except the strawberries. Stew the fruits very gently and not for too long.  They should simply be softened but still retain their shape. Once you feel they are ready put to one side (juice and all) and leave to cool.

Cut the slices of bread or cake, into half then each half into triangles. They do not all have to match perfectly; you will use these to line a 1½ pint/700 ml pudding basin.

Start by lining your pudding basin with cling film. Then continue by dipping a couple of triangles in the juices of the stewed fruits. Lay these in the bottom of the dish and then continue the same way but lining the sides of the basin with bread slices ensuring there are no gaps.

Once completed, fill with the stewed fruits including the strawberries. Cover the top with more juice dipped bread slices. Make sure not to add too much of the juices from the fruits as this may cause the bread to lose its shape. There must be enough to soak into the bread, though.

Place a saucer on the top of the basin and weigh down with something heavy like a tin of tomatoes or beans is ideal. Place in the refrigerator and leave overnight.

The next day, turn the pudding out onto a pretty serving plate, preferably a piece of your transferware, and serve with either the whipped cream or make some lovely custard sauce. If you are lucky enough to have scorching sunny weather, then serve with ice cream and champagne or dessert wine.  Yummy, yummy. yum!!!!

 

 

COLLECTIONS: FLOWER FROGS

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imageimageAbove photos taken by me with my iPhone at Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com of Dollies’ Antiques and Treasures www.dolliesantiques.com who will be outside at the July 29th and 30th Market.  I became fascinated with her collection in May and she explained how she got started collecting Flower Frogs. Another reminder to engage the vendors in conversation, not only are they eager to talk about their treasures but you will learn something new every time…I most certainly do.

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imageA rare matte green flower frog

imageA marriage of a wire cage flower frog on top of a vintage plate.  Owner says it is quite useful for floral centerpieces.  Above photos were taken by Linda Heister of her flower frog collection exclusively for nenasnotes.imageimageimageimageimageAbove photos on how to use your flower frog collection (when not used for flower arrangements) from Pinterest photo credits unknown.

A site to show you how to use flower frogs from Martha Stewart http://www.marthastewart.com/271596/how-to-use-flower-frogs

imageA book, of course, there is….looks quite interesting…found this on Amazon.

When I was a little girl we lived in Rogers Park on the Northside of Chicago (I wish I had that apartment today, it had incredible space, never did understand the long hallway from the front door to the living room but  it did make a great gallery for my Father’s artwork, but no matter, it was extraordinary!) Mom and Dad would often take me with them (read, always took me with them) to dinner and one of our favorite neighborhood spots was in an alley at the end of Howard Street just before you came to Sheridan Road.  It was an exquisite French Bistro and I adored it.  One of their specialties was fried frog legs (don’t get your knickers in a twist, they happen to be delicious, taste rather like chicken, you should be able to find them in the seafood section of a Whole Foods for an example) and I couldn’t eat enough of them.  My Father was of Russian descent, so perhaps his food tastes were a bit more European than most, and he was a superb cook, as was my Mother, (he loved to cook and I would stand on a chair and be his sous chef, I wish I had his recipes, I have shared his borscht with you in a previous post) and I ate many unique items from birth, one ate what was in front of them, I wasn’t told to clean my plate but knew early on that what was there was the choice for that meal, therefore, I eat just about anything (no insects, please and no, they weren’t on Daddy’s menus….).  I am sharing a recipe for Fried Frog Legs that I found on the internet, it sounds much like the recipe used from my childhood….this nostalgia is making me crave them again….I need to get to the Store……..

FRIED FROG LEGS RECIPE FROM HANK SHAW
Prep Time
1 hrs
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
1 hrs 15 mins
This recipe works best with a combination of clarified butter, which you can buy in large supermarkets as Indian ghee, as well as regular unsalted butter. Or, you can clarify butter yourself; my colleague David Lebovitz has a tutorial here. You use the clarified butter to cook the frog legs and the regular butter for the sauce. Why bother? Clarified butter has a higher smoke point and holds up better when frying the frogs, while the regular butter tastes creamier for the sauce. You can, of course, use regular butter for everything, but it will scorch a bit.
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: French
Serves:  4 people
Author: Hank Shaw
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 to 2 pounds frog legs (have your fishmonger remove the skin from the frog legs)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 cup flour
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced very thin
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
Instructions
  1. Soak the frog legs in the milk in the fridge for an hour. Meanwhile, mix the salt, black pepper and flour in a bowl, then chop the garlic and parsley.
  2. Heat 5 tablespoons of the butter in a frying pan large enough to hold all the frog legs; if you don’t have a pan large enough, put a baking sheet in the oven and set a rack inside. Turn the oven to about 180°F. You’ll use this to store the finished frog legs while you fry the rest. If you do have a large enough pan, set the baking sheet with the rack set inside next to the stovetop.
  3. Dredge the frog legs in the seasoned flour and shake off the excess. Fry in the butter over medium-high heat until golden, about 3 to 5 minutes per side. Flip only once if you can help it, as the flour coating is fragile. Set on the rack to drain when the frog legs are done.
  4. Discard the butter in the pan and wipe it out with a paper towel. Set the pan back on the stove over medium-high heat. When the butter is hot, saute the garlic until it smells good, about 1 minute. Turn off the heat and swirl in the lemon juice. Arrange the frog legs on individual plates, and, right before you serve, mix the parsley into the sauce. Pour it over the frog legs and serve immediately.

    Hank Shaw’s comment: “I served my frog legs with sauteed chanterelles and crusty bread. But boiled or roasted fingerling potatoes would be another good option, green beans an ideal veggie, or maybe a bitter greens salad with a vinaigrette dressing. White wine or a lighter beer, i.e., a lager or pilsner, is a must”.

    Hank Shaw’s fascinating site, Hunter Angler Gardner Cook can be found at www.honest-food.net

COLLECTIONS: TERRA COTTA

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imageEach month at the Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com I search for blogging inspiration and I always come across something that entices me.  These pots were no exception!  I found them at the Randolph entrance to RSM at Cosmic Girl Goes Home’s booth along with many other fascinating objects.  The proprietor, Robin Sweeney, doesn’t come every month, she travels from Ohio, but you will be greatly pleased when she is there, I love her ecstatic!  You can find her at her Instagram account @cosmicgirlgoes or on Facebook at cosmic girl goes home.  What I liked about these terra cotta pots is that they are already weathered.  Yes, you can do this yourself or perhaps you have some in your garden shed but if not you are in luck…I love the patina.

imageimageA couple more shots from the booth.  All three photos I took with my iPhone.

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Let’s look at some ways to use them in the garden or in your home….all the following photos were found on Pinterest photo credits unknown.

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A garden arch of terra cotta pots as well as pots for all the blooms.  I want to live there!

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Am I the only person who misses Martha Stewart’s original programs….I simply devoured them and really learned so much.  Perhaps they can be streamed somewhere…can’t you stream everything!!!!  One series she did was with Guy Wolff and it was absolutely fascinating.  Here are a couple of photos of his wonderful work www.guywolff.com.  There are several very interesting Guy Wolff videos on YouTube.

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imageOf course, I have to share his book….what would nenasnotes be without a book recommendation!!!!

The history of terra cotta (earthenware) takes us to ancient times and could be a very long post, instead, I thought I would briefly bring up Emperor Qin the first Emperor of China’s terra cotta army.  Thousands of the terra cotta soldiers were found buried with the Emperor, each with a different face.  I was mesmerized by them when many of them were on exhibition at the Field Museum last year.  You will want to read the entire story here are two sites to give you lots of information, The Smithsonian Museum Magazine www.smithsonianmag.com has a great article as well as National Geographic www.nationalgeographic.com  Check YouTube for in-depth videos on this unique view of history.

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No recipe today, don’t have too much I can do with terra cotta, although you could think up something with fresh clean pots….hum, let’s think about that!!!!  Martha where are you when we need you!!!!

 

 

COLLECTIONS: INSECTS PART 2

imageWSome wonderful prints, dated 1809, from Paper Patty’s booth at Randolph Street Market www.randolphstreetmarket.com

I ended last weeks posting with bees and am moving on today but my friend, Gloria Groom, (if you didn’t read Gloria’s profile that I did several months ago, please do so and be sure to see the Gauguin: Artist as Alchemist exhibition through September 10th at The Art Insitute www.artic.edu sooner rather than later!) called my attention to this glorious paperweight from The Art Institute of Chicago’s collection…isn’t it amazing.  You know me and books so I am including a book on Paul J. Stankard’s extraordinary contemporary creations.

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imageIs this a fly or a bee, I’ll let you be the judge.  It is embroidered on a Schiaparelli Haute Couture dress.  Stunningly beautiful.

imageA botanical of beetles.

imageI posted several photos of the beetle wing embroidered gowns last week…here is a close up of the delicate work.

imageIsn’t this the most beautiful insect pin you have ever seen (there is another one further along in this post) it is by Faberge and is from a dear friend’s jewelry collection.  Photo courtesy of the owner,

imageI do hope none of us encounter any creepy crawlies this size…a bit of English humor.

imageA jeweled beetle minaudiere from Judith Leiber www.judithleiber.com

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Here a scarab mounted in stunning fashion from Stephanie Lake’s talented hands, www.stephanielakedesign.com.  Photo courtesy of Stephanie Lake

imageThe cochineal insect gives us the natural dye, carmine, and is used for fabrics and in our red cosmetic products most particularly lipstick. Who knew!!!!

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imageNot the actual beetle but I thought an interesting illustration.

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imageA couple of photos on dragonflies…I have always been fascinated with them and you don’t see them too often.  This marcasite and enamel pin from Carrie’s Fabulous and Funky booth at the Randolph Street Market.  My photograph.

imageA beaded pillbox with a three-dimensional dragonfly from Judith Leiber.

image A miniature vase by Jay Strongwater  www.jaystrongwater.com  from my signed collection.  We did so many events with this creative genius at Saks Fifth Avenue Chicago.  You can be sure there will be a post on him in the near future!

imageThe second pin from my friend’s jewelry collection….a Faberge spider, this will cure anyone’s fear of the little creatures, don’t you agree!  Photo courtesy of the owner.

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imageInsects captured in amber.

imageI love this watercolor of insects, do you agree?

imageThe back of a jacket by Gucci.  Love it!!!!

ALL PHOTOS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED ARE FROM PINTEREST PHOTO CREDIT UNKNOWN.

I have to do a recipe using honey….there are so many suggestions, you can most certainly add honey to your barbecue sauce for the Fourth of July, or perhaps top your peanut butter sandwich with it (one of my favorite ways to eat peanut butter) or add to your avocado toast, yum yum…I have chosen to give you a recipe for baked brie that you can serve year-round.  Enjoy.

BAKE BRIE WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

Ingredients

  • 1 wedge of brie, about 12 ounces
  • 1/4 cup of honey
  • 1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds
  • 1 large French baguette

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place brie in a baking dish. Drizzle with honey and sprinkle With toasted almonds. Bake for 10 minutes. Serve with thick slices of French bread.

 

 

WEDNESDAY MUSINGS: BAKELITE AT RANDOLPH STREET MARKET

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A treasure trove of Bakelite jewelry including a couple of the coveted cherry pins found in Carrie’s Fabulous to Funky booth at the Randolph Street Market (RSM) www.randolphstreetmarket.com.

In today’s post, I am concentrating on Bakelite jewelry from a couple of RSM‘s vendors along with my pieces.  But as usual, I like to give you a bit of the history behind my features and let you explore more on your own.  By now, I am sure you know I adore research and I love to share my finds with you, my readers.

Bakelite really happened by accident and was introduced in 1907. It was the first synthetic thermosetting plastic ever produced.  It is a hardened plastic that is used for many, many objects. You can find lots of articles on Bakelite by doing your GOOGLE search, one such search will take you to www.thespruce.com and tell you how to identify authentic Bakelite.  A fascinating article.

Another article I found absorbing was on Dr. Leo H. Baekland, www.elvenkrafte.com, it gives you everything you would ever want to know about the subject which is totally fascinating.  The Time cover featuring Dr. Baekland is from that site.

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Check YouTube for a trailer of All Things Bakelite  https://youtu.be/xIrGqiFsa-4

imageA Bakelite phone, you can find something similar at RSM.  I particularly like this in ivory but, of course, you might prefer the more familiar black version! Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageI am crazy about this Art Deco radio…isn’t it a stunner!  Again, you will find vintage radios at the monthly RSM, let me know if one like this hits your eye, I want it!!!! Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageYou know how much I adore anything green….so this desk lamp immediately appealed to me, a bit too modern for my taste, but then again, maybe not!  Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageOr perhaps for your pool table, really cool. Pinterest photo credit unknown.

imageMore pieces from Carrie’s booth, I choose some of the butterscotch pins and bangles along with a couple of adorable napkin rings, love them!  I placed them on one of Carrie’s vintage clothing pieces…this a crazy quilt hostess gown.

imageimageA close up of a couple of the pins.

 

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A fantastic collection of bangles in J&M Antiques booth across the aisle from Carrie’s booth in the Ballroom of Plumbers Hall at Randolph Street Market. There are other vendors at RSM who carry Bakelite jewelry and objects, be sure to stroll through all the aisles both outside and inside and find all manner of treasures!  The next RSM is Saturday and Sunday, July 29 and 30.

imageMy collection of pins all of which I got from RSM over the years, they were made by the same vendor using buttons and broken pieces…I wear them all the time and get huge compliments.  The vendor moved to New York, pity for us, she had really great pieces.

imageI wear these the most (I am particularly fond of the one with the mother of pearl inserts) and I have placed them on one of my crazy quilt pieces.

imageThis one I place on the lapel of a purple looped mohair Oscar de la Renta jacket, it matches perfectly!

imageI think this is quite a unique piece with its braided center and the color combination struck me, had to have it!

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 Looks interesting.  Pinterest photo credit unknown

All photos were taken by Nena unless otherwise noted.